Someone’s retired outfit can be your new ‘look’.

Each year Americans throw away 25,000,000,000 Styrofoam cups. Use a travel mug or ceramic mug for hot beverages at work, and carry a Tupperware container to restaurants for leftovers.

 

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org

Refuse and resist unneeded plastic utensils, napkins, straws, and condiments when you buy take-out foods. Take your own container to pick up take-out.

 

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org

Instead of spending your paycheck on an expensive new outfit or gadget, you can save some cash and help out the environment by shopping at a thrift store. Thrift store shopping is just another form of recycling and regulating CO2 emissions. Not only do you get to reuse a unique or vintage item, but you also stop factories from making more items and creating pollution, and that greatly reduces your carbon footprint.

 

Source: thedailygreen.com

Even if you just bring one, you could save one paper or plastic bag per shopping trip! One year’s worth of average plastic bag consumption in the US requires an estimated 12,000,000 barrels of oil.

 

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org

Each compact fluorescent bulb will keep half a ton of carbon dioxide out of the air over its lifetime. And while compact fluorescents are initially a lot more expensive than the incandescent bulbs you’re used to using, they last ten times as long and can save $30 per year in electricity costs.

 

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org

Whether it’s on the local, state, or national level, let the people who represent you in government know what you think, and what action you expect them to take, concerning issues that are important to you. Write, phone, and email your mayor, governor, and state and national legislative representatives to let them know you’re watching — and that you vote.

 

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org

label one ‘Landfill’ & the other ‘Recycling’. This will encourage you to keep your waste low and remind you to recycle the materials that could still be salvaged.

Either plan ahead by placing frozen items in the refrigerator overnight or defrost them in the microwave. Saves 50 to 150 gallons a month.

 

Source: Monolake.org

Rinse them in a filled sink or pan. Saves 150 to 250 gallons a month.

 

Source: Monolake.org

Source: online-college-reviews.com

Get involved with an organization, such as the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), where activism is encouraged and facilitated. At the NRDC website, for instance, urgent issues are highlighted, and tools and suggestions are provided for making your thoughts known to elected officials.

 

SimpleLivingInstitute.org

Don’t provoke companies to produce new gift wrap by purchasing them…when you can simply re-use newspapers, magazines, left over fabrics and so many other fun creative sources to wrap your gifts in an eco-friendly manner!

Take a cloth bag to hold your purchases and turn down oil-based plastic bags. Remember to wield your purchasing power by supporting businesses that are environmentally friendly, and avoiding those that are not! Shopping online or by mail-order can be a good option – many environmentally friendly e-companies feature fast shipping and minimal packaging.

 

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org

If you have two sinks, fill one with rinse water. If you only have one sink, use a spray device or short blasts instead of letting the water run. Saves 200 to 500 gallons a month.

 

Source: Monolake.org

Check out these sites:

 Paperback Swap

 Bookins

 

Source: theDailyGreen.com

 Use cloth towels or rags instead of paper towels, and cloth napkins in place of paper napkins.

 

Source: simpleLivingInstitute.org

Make sure you’re voting for the representative that most agrees with your views.

 

 

Source: :www.online-college-reviews.com/101-ways-to-go-green-in-college/

in the summer, keep it at 78°F. In the winter, set your thermostat at 68°F in the daytime and 55°F at night. Remember that water heaters work most efficiently between 120°F and 140°F. In your refrigerator, set the temperature at about 37°F and adjust the freezer to operate at about 3°F.

 

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org

Spend your money locally, eat fresh fruits & vegetables (without all the harmful pesticides and fertilizers)… make a day out of it – most farmers markets can be a fun outing with your friends!

Buy durable products that the recipient can use again and again, preferably those made from natural components, such as organic cotton or hemp, and look for products with recycled content. Electronics should feature the Energy Star label, which ensures the product is energy efficient. Look for toys made from natural wood, and avoid plastic toys containing PVC. Gifts can help the recipient go green, such as cloth grocery bags, rechargeable batteries, or compact fluorescent bulbs. Keep in mind gifts can be things to do instead of things to have: gift certificates for yoga or massage, or theatre or concert tickets are good examples. Homemade gifts – coupons, baked goods, music, poetry – are fun to make, and fun to receive.

 

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org

save new materials from ending up in landfills by attending garage sales! (Check out craigslist and newspapers for listings or simply drive around suburbs early Saturday morning – you’re sure to find a garage sale happening!)

You can save even more electricity at home by not watching TV at all!

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org

Saves three gallons each day.

 

Source: Monolake.org

Water is wasted more quickly than you might think. An open faucet lets about 5 gallons of water flow every 2 minutes. In the kitchen, you can save between 10 and 20 gallons of water a day by running the dishwasher only when it’s full. You can save even more by washing dishes by hand in a sink or dishpan containing water, rather than running the tap continuously as you scrub. Run only full loads of laundry through the washer. Take a shorter shower or turn off the shower head while soaping to save water.

 

Source: SimpleLivingInstitute.org